Nutritional aspects of women strength athletes

Nutritional aspects of women strength athletes
J S Volek, C E Forsythe, and W J Kraemer


Strength training elicits sports related and health benefits for both men and women. Although sexual dimorphism is observed in exercise metabolism, there is little information outlining the specific nutritional needs of women strength athletes. Many women athletes restrict energy intake, specifically fat consumption, in order to modify body composition, but this nutritional practice is often counter‐productive. Compared to men, women appear to be less reliant on glycogen during exercise and less responsive to carbohydrate mediated glycogen synthesis during recovery. Female strength athletes may require more protein than their sedentary and endurance training counterparts to attain positive nitrogen balance and promote protein synthesis. Therefore, women strength athletes should put less emphasis on a very high carbohydrate intake and more emphasis on quality protein and fat consumption in the context of energy balance to enhance adaptations to training and improve general health. Attention to timing of nutrient ingestion, macronutrient quality, and dietary supplementation (for example, creatine) are briefly discussed as important components of a nutritionally adequate and effective strength training diet for women.


  • Strength training = good
  • Women utilize more fats and less carbs than men during exercise
  • +ve nitrogen balance required for LBM gains
  • Adequate fat intake required for health gains and optimal hormonal profile
  • Carbs essential for performance -emphasize mico-nutrient-rich and unprocessed whole foods as source of carbs
  • Protein recommendation: 1.4–1.8 g/kg
  • No adverse effects of high protein intake in healthy individuals
  • Good idea to pad workouts with protein-rich meals
  • Creatine = good

Continue reading “Nutritional aspects of women strength athletes”




  • Blood cholesterol is needed for your body to function
  • Dietary cholesterol, for most people, has no significant impact on your cholesterol numbers
  • HDL = good
  • LDL and triglycerides = bad
  • Diet low in saturated fat, high in fiber and omega-3 = beneficial
  • Exercise and Weight loss [If you’re overfat or overweight] = good


Continue reading “Cholesterol”

treats and cheats


This is a common question on the forums:

“I just binged on a box of X, should I do Y amounts of cardio or fast for Z hours?”

And my answer is always “No.”

Exercise is not punishment. Use exercise to gain health and not as penance for your sins at the dining table. Do not beat yourself over it. What’s done is done. Learn from this experience and take a pro-active approach. Continue reading “treats and cheats”